Recovery is one of the top 3 most important factors to consider and think about as a coach writing a program and as an athlete doing your training. In fact I would say together with progressive overload as one unit they are the most important (and only) pair of training principles that work in unison as a whole and when one is missing the other will fall. And when that happens training goes down the crapper.

The reason for the importance of recovery is because if there is no recovery there is no progress and therefore no matter how specific your training is it wont matter. No matter how exact your plan for progression has been it won’t matter. Really nothing else matters.

But here’s the kicker – recovery itself isn’t enough there has to be supercompensation. That means that your training has to be planned (by coaches) and executed (by athletes) in such a way that your body not only recovers from the stressors you gave it but it actually goes above the previous readiness level it was at. There is no point in training the body over endless hours of hard training then recovering just enough to where the body was in the first place before introducing new stressors again. In a case like that all that will happen is the athlete will hit a wall at best.

Recovery is one of the top 3 most important factors to consider and think about as a coach writing a program and as an athlete doing your training. In fact I would say together with progressive overload as one unit they are the most important (and only) pair of training principles that work in unison as a whole and when one is missing the other will fall. And when that happens training goes down the crapper.

The reason for the importance of recovery is because if there is no recovery there is no progress and therefore no matter how specific your training is it wont matter. No matter how exact your plan for progression has been it won’t matter. Really nothing else matters.

But here’s the kicker – recovery itself isn’t enough there has to be supercompensation. That means that your training has to be planned (by coaches) and executed (by athletes) in such a way that your body not only recovers from the stressors you gave it but it actually goes above the previous readiness level it was at. There is no point in training the body over endless hours of hard training then recovering just enough to where the body was in the first place before introducing new stressors again. In a case like that all that will happen is the athlete will hit a wall at best.